Tag Archives: Apple

Apple patent surfaces for oleophobic coating on sapphire

The iPhone 6 is expected to arrive with a sapphire display, which will replace Corning’s offering as a new way to keep the screen safe. This hasn’t been confirmed, but … Continue reading
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Sapphire displays for Apple further tipped by oleophobic coating patent application

Sapphire displays for future Apple devices are looking even more likely, thanks to a patent application published today by the USPTO and found by Apple Insider. The patent describes an oleophobic coating for sapphire glass, which could help the company make smudge-proof sapphire displays.

Oleophobic is a big word, but it basically refers to an oil-resistant coating. You’ll find something like this on just about every touchscreen device out there right now – it’s what keeps the oil in our skin from sticking to our devices.

Apple’s patent application describes a way to bond this coating with sapphire glass, which can then be used “on electronic devices, including, but not limited to, mobile phones and portable computing devices.”

Given that Apple filed the application in September of last year, it seems reasonable to assume the company is actively looking to implement sapphire displays in its devices at some point in the future. Shortly after the patent application filing, Apple signed a five-year $ 578 million deal for sapphire manufacturing with GT Advanced Technology. None of this is proof that Apple will be making the switch, but it’s looking more and more likely.

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Will HTC ever catch up with Samsung and Apple?

HTC vs. Samsung Smartphones

HTC is killing it this week. The decision to release the HTC One (M8) on the same day it was announced was a brilliant move — the phone has been universally praised for its sleek design and any Android owner with an urge to upgrade has to be debating the pros and cons of taking the plunge. But the one thing that stands in HTC’s way is its lack of ability to gain the attention of consumers.

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Apple engineer shares details on the iPhone’s long birth

By now most people are familiar with the introduction of Apple’s iPhone, which debuted in a 2007 Steve Jobs presentation that literally paused the humongous Consumer Electronics Show hundreds of miles away.

I vividly remember because I was at that CES and Apple’s announcement took the wind out of everyone’s sails that day. But the story of how the iPhone came to be is less well-known. The concept began in earnest 2.5 years prior to launch, according to Apple senior software engineer Greg Christie.

Steve Jobs with iphone

Christie hasn’t publicly shared details of the original iPhone’s development process until now, but he spoke with the Wall Street Journal in an interview that published on Wednesday. The commentary is filled with little nuggets of how the iPhone went from a secret project called “Purple” to the final disruptive product Jobs demonstrated on stage January 9, 2007. This is the full presentation, which is worth the long watch:

Christie had worked on the Newton as far back as 1996, but in 2004 Scott Forstall approached him to work on the secret initiative to create a music player that also worked as a phone and used a touchscreen for controls. According to the interview:

“Mr. Christie’s team pored over details like the perfect speed for scrolling lists on the phone and the natural feel of bouncing back when arriving at the end of a list. He said his team ‘banged their head against the wall’ over how to change text messages from a chronological list of individual messages to a series of separate ongoing conversations similar to instant messaging on a computer.”

While Christie’s team worked on the software — at one point using an old Mac and plastic touchscreen device to simulate the slower performance of a phone using ARM chips — Jony Ive was working on the glass and overall phone design.

iphone simulator

According to Christie, Ive didn’t even see the iPhone software for months, not until the third major presentation of the nearly finished product. That speaks to the secrecy of the effort, which also required that work take place in rooms that only a few employees could access.

Even after the famous iPhone presentation, Christie says major changes to iOS took place in the final months leading up to the June 29, 2007 launch date. Mail, for example, originally used two viewing panes — one for the email list and one for reading actual messages, much like how Mail works on the iPad today. Jobs smartly shot that down because he felt the iPhone screen was too small.

crump-ios-mail-vipmailbox

 

After all these years, why would Apple make Christie available to tell the iPhone back story? It’s all about the patents. Christie is listed on five Apple patents, including the “slide to unlock” feature, all of which are part of Apple’s current suit against Samsung for copyright infringement.

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Apple has now sold over 500 million iPhones

Apple iPhone Sales 500 Million

Between the reveal of the Galaxy S5 and the HTC One (M8), March has been the month of the Android smartphone, but while the new flagship devices duke it out on stage, Apple has quietly hit another impressive milestone. Forbes reports that as of this month, Apple has sold its 500 millionth iPhone. This lofty goal was achieved less than a year after the company reached 400 million sales in 2013.

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The stupidest thing anyone has said about Apple in a long time

Apple iWatch Rumors

Sometimes you just have to stop for a moment an breathe it all in… We recently lifted a longtime ban on an awful Apple analyst to share with readers one of the most ridiculous explanations imaginable for Apple’s iPhone 5c flop. The ban was reinstated shortly thereafter. Now, clearly fighting for a spot on our black list, Global Equities Research analyst Trip Chowdry has managed to one-up Mean Gene with what could be the stupidest thing anyone has said about Apple so far this year.

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This is what the next Apple TV should look like

Apple TV Update

Last year, Tim Cook said Apple will be entering a new product category, and ever since he said that, people have been wondering if TVs are Apple’s next target for disruption. Of course, there have been rumors of a new Apple TV for years, but in the past few months these rumors have reached a fever pitch. While we don’t know if or when Cook will release a new Apple TV, we do know what it should look like, thanks to these gorgeous concept designs from Martin Hajek.

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Report: Apple may build an iTunes Android app, launch Spotify rival

Apple executives are looking for ways to deal with declining digital music sales, and options discussed with record label executives apparently include the launch of a Spotify-like music subscription service as well as the idea to use — gasp! — Android for iTunes music sales, according to a Billboard report. Billboard cautions that these currently are just ideas being floated, but both would break with long-held beliefs within Apple.

Steve Jobs famously argued that people don’t want to rent music, and the company has steered clear of any subscription offering ever since. However, in the face of double-digit declines for digital music downloads, subscriptions may look like an increasingly attractive option. Sales of digital songs are down 11 percent year-over-year, according to Nielsen SoundScan. Apple made a first step towards music services when it launched iTunes Radio last year, but a paid subscription service would go significantly further.

The idea that Apple would build an Android app for iTunes seems just as controversial. Sure, Apple did bring iTunes to Windows, but that move was largely meant to increase iPad and iPhone sales. An Android app wouldn’t have such a clear purpose, and be more of an admission that around the world, Android handset sales have been stronger than iPhone sales.

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Apple wins lawsuit over faulty iMac screens

A federal court in California has sided with Apple against a music teacher who claimed his $ 2,259 iMac was an “iLemon” because half of the computer’s 27 inch screen went dim after 18 months.

In a decision published last week in San Jose, U.S. District Judge Edward Chen thew out the teacher’s class action complaint, noting that Apple’s claims about the iMac’s “big, beautiful displays” and “long productive life” did not amount to false advertising because the claims were “mere puffery.”

Chen also ruled that Apple may have known about the defect, which made the computers unsuitable for web browsing, but that it was not obliged to disclose the fault to customers if it fell outside the warranty period and did not create a safety issue. The judge also pointed out that the music teacher had no standing to bring the case since the defect in his iMac appeared after the 12 month warranty expired.

As a result, the teacher and others like him are stuck paying the $ 500 that Apple charged for repairs. The company did not immediately reply to an email request for comment.

This is the second defective product lawsuit that Apple has dodged in the last month. In February, an Oakland court threw out a class action against iPhone voice assistant Siri, once again on grounds that claims about Siri’s abilities were “mere puffery” — an old legal term used to distinguish between real promises and ad lingo.

You can read the case, which was spotted by Law360, below. The judge gave the plaintiff 30 days to amend his complaint and try again.

iMac Class Action Ruling

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Tim Cook slams author who claims Apple on the decline after Steve Jobs

Tim Cook Vs. Yukari Kane: Haunted Empire

Tim Cook may come across as outwardly calm and collected but he definitely has fire in his belly when the time calls for it. Business Insider notes that the Apple CEO was asked during a CNBC interview on Tuesday about Yukari Iwatani Kane’s new book about Apple after the death of Steve Jobs and he didn’t mince words.

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